Adventures in Vet Techin'

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Faces of FIV by wee3beasties on Flickr.The felines that live free in Apollo’s House at C&W Rustic Hollow Shelter have been diagnosed with FIV. Granted, they have a much better prognosis than cats with FeLV, but these felines are still often viewed unadoptable and euthanized. At the C&W sanctuary, FIV+ felines live out their lives in comfort.
[SOOC, f/1.4, ISO 1000, shutter speed 1/320, -2/3 EV]
Info on FIV cats taken directly from vetmedicine.about.com/od/diseasesconditionscat/a/CW-FIV.htm :
About FIV
Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a virus that can cause a multitude of health problems in cats due to reduced immune system function. It can cause an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome sometimes called feline AIDS.
Cause
FIV is a virus from the same family as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but it is a separate virus specific to cats. It cannot be transmitted to humans or other species. There are several subtypes of the virus. Once a cat is infected, it will be infected for life. However, the percentage of cats that will go on to develop reduced immune function from the virus is unknown, and it can take many years for such problems to develop.Therefore, a positive diagnosis of FIV does not automatically carry a bad prognosis, and is not a death sentence.
Transmission and Risk Factors
FIV is spread mainly via bite wounds. Therefore, cats that fight are at the highest risk of being infected with FIV, such as cats allowed to roam outdoors and male cats (which tend to fight, especially when not neutered). It can also be transmitted from infected mother cats to their kittens.
Signs and Symptoms
After first being infected with FIV, cats may experience transient symptoms including:
•Fever
•Enlarged lymph nodes
•Low white blood cell count
Cats generally recover uneventfully from this phase and may then appear healthy for some time, often several years. However, the virus can gradually attack and weaken the immune system, leading to a host of secondary health problems. The course of illness with FIV is difficult to predict, but generally, any of the following may be seen when immune system function deteriorates:
•Enlarged lymph nodes
•Weight loss
•Loss of appetite
•Recurring fever
•Diarrhea
•Infections (e.g., mouth, skin, respiratory, gastrointestinal, urinary tract)
•Cancer
•Neurological signs (e.g., behavior changes, seizures)
Diagnosis of FIV
FIV infection is diagnosed by a blood test to detect antibodies to the virus. There are several methods of testing (each with pros and cons), and often more than one is used to confirm a result. Multiple tests over time may also be needed to completely rule out FIV, depending on the situation.
Treatment of FIV
Once infected, a cat will remain infected for life, and treatment is often focused on managing diseases resulting from diminished immune function (e.g., antibiotics for infections). Medications that strengthen the immune system such as interferon and Imulan (a new veterinary drug) can be used, and antiviral drugs such as AZT may also be tried in some cases. Your vet will recommend a course of treatment that is right for your cat.
Caring for a Cat with FIV
A cat with a diagnosis of FIV can live for many years, and there are several precautions that can be taken with FIV cats to help manage the disease:
•FIV positive cats should be kept indoors - to prevent exposure to possible infectious agents and also to prevent them from transmitting the virus to other cats. 
•Visit your vet at least twice yearly for routine check ups to catch any potential problems early on.
•Monitor FIV positive cats closely for any signs of illness and seek treatment as soon as possible.
•Feed a high quality diet and nutritional supplements as recommended by your vet. However, avoid raw diets as they may contain bacteria and parasites that could negatively affect an FIV infected cat.
•Effective flea treatment should be used, as fleas can transmit diseases to cats.
•Maintain routine vaccination protocols and parasite control programs. Regular dental care is also recommended.
•Introduce new cats to the household slowly to ensure non-stressful/non-injurious interactions.
Multi-Cat Households
There is minimal risk of transmission of FIV between household cats that get along well. Discuss your specific household situation and inter-cat concerns with your vet. Removing an FIV positive cat from the home is generally not necessary. All cats in the household should be kept indoors, kept up to date on vaccinations, and health concerns addressed as soon as possible; i.e. don’t wait if your cat is “quieter than normal” or not feeling well.

Faces of FIV by wee3beasties on Flickr.

The felines that live free in Apollo’s House at C&W Rustic Hollow Shelter have been diagnosed with FIV. Granted, they have a much better prognosis than cats with FeLV, but these felines are still often viewed unadoptable and euthanized. At the C&W sanctuary, FIV+ felines live out their lives in comfort.

[SOOC, f/1.4, ISO 1000, shutter speed 1/320, -2/3 EV]

Info on FIV cats taken directly from vetmedicine.about.com/od/diseasesconditionscat/a/CW-FIV.htm :

About FIV
Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a virus that can cause a multitude of health problems in cats due to reduced immune system function. It can cause an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome sometimes called feline AIDS.

Cause
FIV is a virus from the same family as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but it is a separate virus specific to cats. It cannot be transmitted to humans or other species. There are several subtypes of the virus. Once a cat is infected, it will be infected for life. However, the percentage of cats that will go on to develop reduced immune function from the virus is unknown, and it can take many years for such problems to develop.Therefore, a positive diagnosis of FIV does not automatically carry a bad prognosis, and is not a death sentence.

Transmission and Risk Factors
FIV is spread mainly via bite wounds. Therefore, cats that fight are at the highest risk of being infected with FIV, such as cats allowed to roam outdoors and male cats (which tend to fight, especially when not neutered). It can also be transmitted from infected mother cats to their kittens.

Signs and Symptoms
After first being infected with FIV, cats may experience transient symptoms including:
•Fever
•Enlarged lymph nodes
•Low white blood cell count

Cats generally recover uneventfully from this phase and may then appear healthy for some time, often several years. However, the virus can gradually attack and weaken the immune system, leading to a host of secondary health problems. The course of illness with FIV is difficult to predict, but generally, any of the following may be seen when immune system function deteriorates:

•Enlarged lymph nodes
•Weight loss
•Loss of appetite
•Recurring fever
•Diarrhea
•Infections (e.g., mouth, skin, respiratory, gastrointestinal, urinary tract)
•Cancer
•Neurological signs (e.g., behavior changes, seizures)

Diagnosis of FIV
FIV infection is diagnosed by a blood test to detect antibodies to the virus. There are several methods of testing (each with pros and cons), and often more than one is used to confirm a result. Multiple tests over time may also be needed to completely rule out FIV, depending on the situation.

Treatment of FIV
Once infected, a cat will remain infected for life, and treatment is often focused on managing diseases resulting from diminished immune function (e.g., antibiotics for infections). Medications that strengthen the immune system such as interferon and Imulan (a new veterinary drug) can be used, and antiviral drugs such as AZT may also be tried in some cases. Your vet will recommend a course of treatment that is right for your cat.

Caring for a Cat with FIV
A cat with a diagnosis of FIV can live for many years, and there are several precautions that can be taken with FIV cats to help manage the disease:
•FIV positive cats should be kept indoors - to prevent exposure to possible infectious agents and also to prevent them from transmitting the virus to other cats.
•Visit your vet at least twice yearly for routine check ups to catch any potential problems early on.
•Monitor FIV positive cats closely for any signs of illness and seek treatment as soon as possible.
•Feed a high quality diet and nutritional supplements as recommended by your vet. However, avoid raw diets as they may contain bacteria and parasites that could negatively affect an FIV infected cat.
•Effective flea treatment should be used, as fleas can transmit diseases to cats.
•Maintain routine vaccination protocols and parasite control programs. Regular dental care is also recommended.
•Introduce new cats to the household slowly to ensure non-stressful/non-injurious interactions.

Multi-Cat Households
There is minimal risk of transmission of FIV between household cats that get along well. Discuss your specific household situation and inter-cat concerns with your vet. Removing an FIV positive cat from the home is generally not necessary. All cats in the household should be kept indoors, kept up to date on vaccinations, and health concerns addressed as soon as possible; i.e. don’t wait if your cat is “quieter than normal” or not feeling well.

Filed under FIV cats veterinary shelter medicine

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  8. xelahu reblogged this from iheartvmt and added:
    Very nice. Thank you
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    Love those who love and care for the FIV kitties. I hope there is a cure/successful treatment soon
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